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Hypentelium nigricans  (Lesueur, 1817)

Northern hog sucker
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Image of Hypentelium nigricans (Northern hog sucker)
Hypentelium nigricans
Picture by Lyons, J.


United States (contiguous states) country information

Common names: [No common name]
Occurrence: native
Salinity: freshwater
Abundance: common (usually seen) | Ref: Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr, 1991
Importance: | Ref:
Aquaculture: | Ref:
Regulations: | Ref:
Uses: gamefish: yes;
Comments: From Mohawk-Hudson River in New York to Altamaha River in northern Georgia; from Pascagoula River in Mississippi to Comite River in Louisiana. Reported from Mobile Bay drainage, Alabama and Chattahoochee River drainage, Georgia (Ref. 5723); in Ballard Creek outside of Sallisaw, Oklahoma (Charles Perez, pers. comm.).
National Checklist:
Country Information: https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/us.html
National Fisheries Authority: https://www.nmfs.gov
Occurrences: Occurrences Point map
Main Ref: Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr, 1991
National Database:

Classification / Names

Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Cypriniformes (Carps) > Catostomidae (Suckers) > Catostominae
Common names | Synonyms | Catalog of Fishes (gen., sp.) | ITIS | CoL

Main reference

Size / Weight / Age

Max length : 61.0 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 5723); common length : 29.8 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 12193); max. published weight: 480.00 g (Ref. 40637)

Environment

Freshwater; demersal; potamodromous (Ref. 51243)

Climate / Range

Temperate; 46°N - 30°N

Distribution

North America: Great Lakes, Hudson Bay and Mississippi River basins from New York in USA and Ontario in Canada to Minnesota and south to Alabama, Arkansas and Louisiana in USA; from Mohawk-Hudson River to Altamaha River in USA; from Pascagoula River to Comite River in USA.
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Inhabits rocky riffles, runs and pools of clear creeks and small rivers. Occasionally found in large rivers and impoundments (Ref. 5723, 10294). Feeds on immature stages of benthic insects and snails (Ref. 10294). It feeds by disturbing the stream bottom with its large snout and sucking up organisms that it dislodges (Ref. 84357).

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 90363)

Threat to humans

  Harmless



Human uses

More information

Common names
Synonyms
Metabolism
Predators
Ecotoxicology
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Fecundity
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Length-frequencies
Morphometrics
Morphology
Larvae
Larval dynamics
Recruitment
Abundance
References
Aquaculture
Aquaculture profile
Strains
Genetics
Allele frequencies
Heritability
Diseases
Processing
Mass conversion
Collaborators
Pictures
Stamps, Coins
Sounds
Ciguatera
Speed
Swim. type
Gill area
Otoliths
Brains
Vision

Tools

Special reports

Download XML

Internet sources

Estimates of some properties based on models

Phylogenetic diversity index (Ref. 82805)
PD50 = 0.6250 many relatives (e.g. carps) 0.5 - 2.0 few relatives (e.g. lungfishes)

Trophic Level (Ref. 69278)
3.3   ±0.43 se; Based on food items.

Resilience (Ref. 69278)
Low, minimum population doubling time 4.5 - 14 years (Preliminary K or Fecundity.)

Vulnerability (Ref. 59153)
Moderate to high vulnerability (46 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown