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Terapon jarbua  (Forsskål, 1775)

Jarbua terapon
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| Native range | All suitable habitat | PointMap | Year 2100 |
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Terapon jarbua   AquaMaps   Data sources: GBIF OBIS
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Image of Terapon jarbua (Jarbua terapon)
Terapon jarbua
Picture by Cook, D.C.


Somalia country information

Common names: [No common name]
Occurrence: native
Salinity: freshwater
Abundance: | Ref:
Importance: | Ref:
Aquaculture: | Ref:
Regulations: | Ref:
Uses: no uses
Comments: Also Ref. 12484.
National Checklist:
Country Information: https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/so.html
National Fisheries Authority:
Occurrences: Occurrences Point map
Main Ref: Sommer, C., W. Schneider and J.-M. Poutiers, 1996
National Database:

Classification / Names

Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Perciformes (Perch-likes) > Terapontidae (Grunters or tigerperches)
Common names | Synonyms | Catalog of Fishes (gen., sp.) | ITIS | CoL

Common names from other countries

Main reference

Size / Weight / Age

Max length : 36.0 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 9710); common length : 25.0 cm SL male/unsexed; (Ref. 4967)

Length at first maturity
Lm 13.0  range ? - ? cm

Environment

Marine; freshwater; brackish; demersal; catadromous (Ref. 51243); depth range 20 - 350 m (Ref. 58488)

Climate / Range

Tropical; 26°C - 29°C (Ref. 4959); 32°N - 34°S, 23°E - 170°W

Distribution

Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to Samoa, north to southern Japan, south to the Arafura Sea (Ref. 9819), Australia, and Lord Howe Island.
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Short description

Dorsal spines (total): 11 - 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 - 10. Lower opercular spine extending well beyond the opercular flap. Post temporal bone exposed posteriorly and serrate. Body color is fawn above, cream below, nape dark; head, body and fins with and iridescent sheen. Three or four curved dark brown bands run from the nape to the hind part of the body, the lowermost continuing across the middle of the caudal fin.

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Found over shallow sandy bottoms, in the vicinity of river mouths. Enter estuaries and rivers (Ref. 1479, 11230, 44894, 48635). Adults in loose aggregations (Ref. 48635). Juveniles common in sandy intertidal areas; often in tidal pools. Minimum depth reported is 20 m (Ref. 12260). Found in schools (Ref. 9710). Omnivorous (Ref. 7300), feeding on fishes, insects, algae, and sand-dwelling invertebrates (Ref. 9710). Spawn in the sea and juveniles migrate into fresh water (Ref. 2847). Eggs are guarded and fanned by the male parent (Ref. 205). Produce sound (Ref. 9137). Marketed fresh, dried or salted (Ref. 12693).

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 90363)

Threat to humans

  Harmless



Human uses

Fisheries: minor commercial; aquaculture: commercial

More information

Common names
Synonyms
Metabolism
Predators
Ecotoxicology
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Fecundity
Eggs
Egg development
References
Aquaculture
Aquaculture profile
Strains
Genetics
Allele frequencies
Heritability
Diseases
Processing
Mass conversion
Collaborators
Pictures
Stamps, Coins
Sounds
Ciguatera
Speed
Swim. type
Gill area
Otoliths
Brains
Vision

Tools

Special reports

Download XML

Internet sources

Estimates of some properties based on models

Phylogenetic diversity index (Ref. 82805)
PD50 = 0.6250 many relatives (e.g. carps) 0.5 - 2.0 few relatives (e.g. lungfishes)

Trophic Level (Ref. 69278)
3.9   ±0.7 se; Based on diet studies.

Resilience (Ref. 69278)
Medium, minimum population doubling time 1.4 - 4.4 years (K=0.24)

Vulnerability (Ref. 59153)
Moderate vulnerability (37 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown